18.03.22 - South Loop Strength & Conditioning

18.03.22

Fitness
A. E30s for 6 sets:
1 power snatch – 1s pause in receiving position
-Into
E45s for 4 sets:
1 power snatch – 1s pause in receiving position
-Into
EMOTM 3:
1 power snatch
Training notes:
-Each group of intervals is 3 minutes.
-Build in weight as able as rest increases. No missed lifts.
-Actually fully pause in the receiving position. Don’t just slow down. Learn where your body is in space, and make sure that you have a good overhead position and that your hips are pushed back in a position that you could squat from if you had to.

B. 27-21-15:
DB snatches, alternating
Bike/row calories
*12 minute cap.
Training notes:
-DB snatch weight should be “moderate” – you should be able to do the set of 21 unbroken, but it may not be wise to.
-Adjust the pace on the bike and row based upon how you feel during DB snatches. You should have an idea of what kind of pace is “tough but sustainable” and won’t significantly impact your ability to move on the DB snatches.

C. 8 min:
30s crab plank
30s single-leg calf raises, right – hold top position for 1
30s crab plank
30s single-leg calf raises, left – hold top position for 1s
Training notes:
-Focus on feeling hips pushed up and stability through shoulders on crab plank.
-Use a post on the rig as necessary for balance on calf raises.
-Focus on actually getting full range of motion on the way up on calf raises and drive through the ball of your foot. If you can’t get more than a centimeter or two of range of motion on this, that’s indicative of something that should be addressed.

Performance
A. E30s for 6 sets:
1 squat snatch
-Into
E45s for 4 sets:
1 squat snatch
-Into
EMOTM 3:
1 squat snatch
Training notes:
-Each group of intervals is 3 minutes.
-Build in weight as able as rest increases. No missed lifts.
-Priority is good positions and repeatability on short rest. Don’t expect to set a personal record.

B. 27-21-15:
Power snatches (95/65)
Bike/row calories
*12 minute cap.
Training notes:
-Power snatch weight should be “moderate” – you should be able to do the set of 21 unbroken, but it may not be wise to.
-Adjust the pace on the bike and row based upon how you feel during power snatches. You should have an idea of what kind of pace is “tough but sustainable” and won’t significantly impact your ability to move on the power snatches.
-Transition quickly. Get on the bike or the erg right away – even if you move slowly for a few seconds. Slow your pace down on your last calorie or two so that you can immediately get off and pick up the bar.

C. 8 min:
30s crab walk, forward
30s single-leg calf raises off of 2” platform, right – hold top position for 1
30s crab walk, backward
30s single-leg calf raises off of 2” platform, left – hold top position for 1s
Training notes:
-Crab walk position forces good control of shoulders in extension – which is one of the most common faults in the CrossFitting population and may be one of the potential reasons that you suck at ring muscle-ups but can do them ok on the bar.
-Use a post on the rig as necessary for balance on calf raises.
-Focus on actually getting full range of motion on the way up on calf raises and drive through the ball of your foot. Another common movement pattern difficulty is inability to actually get all the way up onto your toes. This is a problem if you can’t do this.

When assessing problems with the front rack, the obvious culprits are the shoulders, the upper back, and the wrists. – Most coaches have seen someone struggle in the catch position on a clean and told them to try foam rolling their thoracic spine with the hopes that the front rack position will improve. – In competitive fitness athletes, it's a mistake to leave out the assessment of the elbow – especially with the volume of upper body pulling done in the sport. – Many athletes end up with hypertonicity of the biceps and forearms and feel a cramping sensation when asked to control full range of motion elbow flexion. It's also not uncommon to see restrictions in elbow rotation. – If the brain can't control elbow flexion and rotation through the range of motion required to achieve a solid front rack, other body parts will compensate – like the hips, often leading to a bizarre and sketchy front rack position. – Check out some info from @gripapproach to learn more about these assessment protocols as well as some corrective exercises to develop better motor control. @karlieshields #CrossFit #legionathlete #mynameislegion #frontrack #mobility

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